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Programming language: Scala
License: MIT License
Tags: Misc    

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README

Easy Config

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Easy Config makes Scala application configuration extremely easy. It reads configuration from the environment or command line arguments.

Features

  • You define a case class for your configuration, and Easy Config gives you an instance. That's it.
  • Reads default value from the case class if environment variable or command line argument is not present.
  • Environment variables can be overridden by command line arguments.
  • Can parse most common types, including Options and Lists.
  • Has a Secret data type for storing secret values. It prevents accidental printing or logging of the secret value.
  • Returns help message for command line arguments -h and --help.
  • Returns help message if the configuration is not present or malformed.
  • Nested configurations are not supported yet.

Usage

Include it in your project by adding the following to your build.sbt:

libraryDependencies += "com.github.kovszilard" %% "easy-config" % "0.2.1"

Request configuration or a help String if something goes wrong.

import easyconfig._

object MyApp extends App {

  case class Config(foo: Int, bar: String, baz: Option[List[Int]] = None)

  val config = easyConfig[Config](args)

  config.fold(
    help => println(help),
    config => //do something with the configuration
      println(s"Configuration: $config")
  )

}

Field name conversions

Environment variables

Simple lower case fields are expected to be all uppercase environment variables. For example, field name expected to be NAME in the environment.

Camel cased fields are expected to be all uppercase environment variables with an underscore before each uppercase letter. For example, field firstName expected to be FIRST_NAME or customerFirstName expected to be CUSTOMER_FIRST_NAME in the environment.

Command line arguments

Simple lower case fields are expected to be the same with trailing double dashes. For example, field name expected to be --name in command line arguments.

Camel cased fields are expected to be all lowercase letters with trailing double dashes and a dash before each uppercase letter. For example, field firstName expected to be --first-name or customerFirstName expected to be --customer-first-name in command line arguments.

Configuration precedence

Case class default values < Environment variables < Command line arguments

Default values defined on the case class are overridden by environment variables. In addition, command line arguments override configuration provided in the environment.

Parsing

Arguments separated with spaces

You can define fullName in the environment as FULL_NAME="John Smith".

Or, in command line as --full-name "John Smith"

Lists

Lists are separated by commas. In the environment FRUITS="apple,banana"

Or, in command line as --fruits apple,banana

NOTE: trailing spaces are included, so FRUITS="apple, banana" or --fruits apple, banana will become List("apple", " banana").

Creating parsers

In case you have a not supported data type or you want to parse differently than Easy Config does it, then you have to create a parser for yourself. Luckily it is very easy, just define an implicit Parser instance using the createParser method. createParser takes a function from String to Try[A], where A is your data type.

See an examples below:

import scala.util.Try
import easyconfig._
import easyconfig.Parser
import easyconfig.Parser.createParser

object CustomParser extends App {

  case class Name(first: String, last: String)

  implicit val nameParser: Parser[Name] = createParser{ str =>
    Try{
      val fullname = str.split(" ")
      Name(fullname(0), fullname(1))
    }
  }

  case class Config(name: Name)

  val config = easyConfig[Config](args)

  config.fold(
    help => println(help),
    config => //do something with the configuration
      println(s"Configuration: $config\n")
  )
}

Using Secret

import easyconfig._

object Secret extends App {

  case class Config(password: Secret)

  val config = easyConfig[Config](args)

  config.fold(
    help => println(help),
    config =>
      println(s"Printing or logging the configuration won't reveal the secret: $config\n" +
              s"Secret can be revealed by explicitly calling secretValue: ${config.password.secretValue}")
  )

}

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